Photo and video timeline – Kīlauea – July 28, 2022

During the investigation, a helicopter flew about 150 feet above the ground, carrying a hoop 40 feet in diameter suspended 35 feet below. The system transmits weak low-frequency radio waves into the ground, measures the Earth’s response, and passively detects changes in the Earth’s magnetic field. These variations will allow scientists to create a picture of the shallow (upper 2,000 feet) magmatic structure, fault systems, and subterranean waterways beneath Kīlauea’s surface.

You can read more about this investigation on the project’s webpage: https://www.usgs.gov/supplemental-appropriations-for-disaster-recovery-…

Or in this “Volcano Watch” article: https://www.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo/news/volcano-watch-playing-wire-…

Sources/Usage: Public domain.

This morning, July 28, the USGS-Hawaiian Volcano Observatory conducted the airborne electromagnetic and magnetic (AEM) survey over the summit caldera of Kaluapele – Kīlauea – in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. A helicopter flew about 120-175 feet above the ground in a grid-like pattern with a 40-foot horizontal loop suspended 35 feet below. This photo, taken from the lookout near Keanakāko’i crater, shows the helicopter conducting the survey, with the caldera walls and Mauna Loa in the background. USGS photo by J. Kauahikaua.
Color photograph of a helicopter survey over a volcano

Sources/Usage: Public domain.

An airborne electromagnetic and magnetic (AEM) survey view over the Kaluapele Summit Caldera – Kīlauea – taken from Uēkahuna Lookout in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. The loop system under the helicopter transmits weak low frequency radio waves into the ground and measures the Earth’s response while passively detecting changes in the Earth’s magnetic field. These variations will allow scientists to image the shallow (upper 2,000 feet) magmatic structure, fault systems, and subsurface waterways below Kīlauea’s surface. USGS photo by K. Mulliken.
Color photograph of a helicopter survey over a volcano

Sources/Usage: Public domain.

A telephoto view from the airborne electromagnetic and magnetic (AEM) survey over Kaluapele (Kīlauea’s summit caldera) on July 28, 2022. The helicopter and hoop are visible in the center of the image, surveying the fallen block in Kilauea Caldera. This project is funded by the Disaster Relief Supplementary Appropriations Act of 2019 (HR 2157), which supports investigations into the current state of Kīlauea Volcano following the eruption of the Lower East Rift Zone in 2018 and the summit collapse. Data collected during the survey will allow USGS scientists to create a picture of what lies below the surface of Kīlauea Volcano, including shallow magmatic structures, fault systems, and waterways. underground. USGS photo by K. Mulliken.
Color photograph of a helicopter survey over a volcano

Sources/Usage: Public domain.

Another telephoto view from the Airborne Electromagnetic and Magnetic (AEM) survey, taken as the helicopter crossed the floor of Halema’uma’u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. This photo was taken from Uēkahuna Viewpoint in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, and the helicopter and loop are visible in the center left of the image. The flight took place approximately 150 feet above the ground, with the hoop hanging an additional 35 feet below the helicopter. Experienced pilots specially trained and licensed for low-level flight flew the aircraft. USGS photo by K. Mulliken.
Color photograph of a helicopter survey over a volcano

Sources/Usage: Public domain.

From the eruption viewing area near Keanakāko’i Crater in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, the helicopter and airborne electromagnetic and magnetic (AEM) survey hoop were visible in the Kīlauea caldera on July 28, 2022. This survey, which is funded by the Disaster Relief Supplementary Appropriations Act of 2019 (HR 2157) is taking place throughout July in uninhabited parts of Kīlauea. Data collected during the survey will inform USGS scientists about magma, faulting, and groundwater structures beneath Kīlauea’s surface. USGS photo by J. Kauahikaua.

Jack C. Nugent